What Is Normal Wear and Tear In Trucks?

Trucks are tough vehicles for heavy-duty work, but they are also subject to excessive wear and tear because of the same reason. Generally, we consider all the damages the truck bears before you drive away. We understand that normal wear and tear and truck maintenance are part of owning a truck, and holding you accountable is not something rentals practice. However, some damages can be excessive, which you may be held responsible for.

Therefore, we have made this guide that establishes differences between normal and excessive wear and tear. This will help you understand what damages you are accountable for when your rental term ends.

Dents and Scratches

Normal:

Scratches and scuffs that can be overlooked are normal for trucks. They are usually caused by gravel or debris, by no fault of the driver. Generally, scratches less than 25mm in diameter are considered normal. Exterior damages, including minor dents and scratches that do not break the paint surface, fall under the category of normal wear and tear.

Excessive:

Damages caused by hail on the bonnet, roof, or doors are the driver’s responsibility. While minor scratches are ignored, scratches or damage of any diameter that goes through the paint surface are excessive wear and tear and are the driver’s accountability. Moreover, if the scratches are minor but gathered in one place, requiring an expensive paint job, it is the customer’s responsibility. We usually rent trucks for long periods where the vehicle can suffer rust and corrosion, which is the rentee’s responsibility.

Stone Chips

Normal:

Stone chipping is also genuine damage that trucks are subject to because of heavy-duty vehicles’ high pressure on the roads. Therefore, minor chipping is acceptable, accounting for the rental’s expense.

Excessive:

However, if a single area bears multiple chipping, causing a large part of the paint surface to chip away, it is the customer’s responsibility to pay for the repairs.

Bumpers and Grill

Normal:

Normal wear and tear can be anything, including scrapes and scratches that are not visible unless noticed with keen attention. Damages on the bumper that do not require costly maintenance and do not penetrate the paint surface are normal wear and tear. Similarly, the grill’s chrome polish can suffer small scratches, and tiny chipping is regular damage for trucks.

Excessive:

If the chrome grill cracks or requires complete polishing, it comes under excessive wear and tear, for which the driver is accountable. Bumpers are there to protect the truck’s body, but any significant dent or bent on the rear or front bumper which is highly visible is out of bounds for everyday wear and tear. Any damage penetrating the paint comes under this category if the bumpers are painted.

Wheels and Tires

Normal:

Wheels and tires are subject to the most amount of damage because they’re the main point of contact with the road. That’s why regular scuffs and scratches they might pick up on any normal road are not the driver’s responsibility. Punctures are also common for tires. Hence, they are not the driver’s responsibility.

Excessive:

On the other hand, any bent or broken parts, such as wheel cap and wheel trim, are the driver’s responsibility. Similarly, tires can wear out during a lengthy rental period. Meanwhile, any replaced tire should be of the same brand and exact specifications. Dry rots, cuts, worn-out treads, or plugged sidewalls are all the rentee’s responsibility.

Windscreen, Windows, and Mirrors

Normal:

There’s not much room for normal wear for glass parts as the slightest damage requires the complete replacement of the glass. However, if there are only a few scratches or a crack that is less than 0.25 inches and not in the driver’s sight, your renter might be able to reach a compromise with you.

Excessive:

Any damage, including scratches, chips, or cracks on the windscreen, windows, and mirrors that are not avoidable or cannot be buffed, is excessive wear and tear. Damage to lenses that compromise a vehicle’s status from passing road-worthiness is also the driver’s responsibility.

Upholstery, Floor, Dashboard, Cleanliness

Normal:

The upholstery and floor consist of fabric that is understandably subject to wear and tear over time. Similarly, the dashboard’s fiber, plastic, and chrome can suffer minor scuffs and scratches. Any minor damage that can be removed or dealt with by general cleaning and polishing is within the normal wear and tear bounds.

Excessive:

Stains that cannot be removed and require the part to be replaced come under excessive wear, which is the driver’s responsibility. This also includes cuts, tears, rips, and burns on the upholstery, carpet, and dashboard. Any missing part from the interior is also the driver’s liability.

Essentials and Accessories

Normal:

Minor damages like scuffs that do not compromise the functionality of essential equipment like the keys and entertainment systems are acceptable under regular wear and tear.

Excessive:

Missing equipment, broken parts, and damaged or missing accessories are all subject to excessive wear and tear. These include keys, remotes, DVD players, radio, cargo cover, handles, knobs, wipers, and tools. Damaged causes during repairing and unauthorized parts installation come under driver’s liability.

Ending Note

Flex Fleet Rental ensures that you only get the best trucks that put your comfort and functionality first. Therefore, these guidelines help you understand how you can take care of the truck as your own. That way, we can maintain a healthy relationship knowing the truck maintenance cost that each party should bear beforehand.